North Georgia student sues state agency, who says he can no longer play HS sports

Colton Lane says his parents are divorced, and he switched schools to move in with his father - but the Georgia High School Association (GHSA) says he followed a coach, and that's against their rules. (Image: WTVC)

A North Georgia student is suing the state agency that oversees high school football regulations. He says they are keeping him from getting a sports scholarship to college, but the organization says he broke the rules.

Colton Lane recently transferred from LaFayette High School to Northwest Whitfield for his senior year.

He says his parents are divorced, and he switched schools to move in with his father - but the Georgia High School Association (GHSA) says he followed a coach, and that's against their rules.

Colton was one of LaFayette High School's top athletes, playing football in the fall, and baseball in the spring.

"Well, I started football around 5th Grade and I played baseball all my life," says Colton.

With every practice, he says he grew in skills and speed, and grew more to depend on that outlet and his teammates during rough patches in life.

One of the hardest was when his mom and stepfather divorced.

"It's just helped me with a lot of things just all the teammates being there and talking to people."

Colton says his mother got a new job, and asked him to choose - live with her in Pennsylvania, or his father in Whitfield County.

"It was hard. It was hard, but I've adjusted well here at Northwest, made some new friends, but miss all my friends from back home."

Colton moved in with his dad and transferred to Northwest Whitfield High School.

With the promise of college scholarships ahead, he planned to play football again, but his attorney says he hit a road block.

"This past month ago, the GHSA ruled that Colton was ineligible to proceed to participate in any activity whatsoever," says Robert McCurry.

LaFayette's former head football coach moved to Northwest Whitfield, about six months ahead of Colton.

The GHSA rules say a student athlete transferring will be ruled ineligible for one year if the player followed a coach who moved to another school.

But Colton and his attorneys say the timing of the move was pure coincidence.

"Colton was forced to come to Northwest because of the mother's change of employment," says McCurry.

As his senior season slowly plays out without him, Colton says he hopes GHSA reconsiders.

"I just really want to play, that's all."

Colton isn't allowed to wear a uniform or pads at the games, but he still stands with his teammates, hoping he can join them before the chance of football scholarships slips away.

You can read the entire lawsuit below: (Reading this on our mobile app? Tap here to open an external browser window to read the lawsuit)


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