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Community continues to raise money for volunteer fire chief killed by cancer

On Saturday, his community put together a benefit event selling food, taking bids for silent auctions and having a little fun with Karaoke. All the proceeds are going to a fund to help support his family. (image WTVC)

Ask anyone in Soddy Daisy. They'll tell you a story about Chief Mike Brumlow.

Brumlow spent more than 30 years of service with the Sequoyah Volunteer Fire Department. He spent 10 of those years as its chief. Hearts in Soddy-Daisy broke when they learned Brumlow lost his battle with Esophageal Cancer in June. Since then, they've laid him to rest and began focusing their attention on taking care of his family while sharing stories about him.

"Mike taught me how to drive a fire truck," said Sharon Worley. She said Chief recruited her and her son to join the volunteer fire department. " I was on four scenes of an active fire. I went exterior attack of an active fire, pumped fire trucks, none of that would be possible without Mike Brumlow."

On Saturday, his community put together a benefit event selling food, taking bids for silent auctions and having a little fun with Karaoke. All the proceeds are going to a fund to help support his family.

"Every penny, everything was donated so every penny that is raised today will go directly to the fund," said Liz Pierce of the Mowbray Volunteer Fire Department. "[It] will go to Mike's family to help pay for any expenses they have and will continue to have."

People enjoyed the benefit while they shared their memories of Chief.

"We had multiple dinners, Mike was always big about having a family night," said Trevor Lottinville. He used to be a Sequoyah firefighter under Chief Brumlow.

"So every other Friday or Saturday, we'd go bowling as a fire department, or out to dinner. He was like the father figure of the department."

"The karaoke DJ, he gave her away at her wedding," said Adam Presley. He is the president of the Saddle Pals Club, who provided the venue for the event.

Some stories brought out emotion with the memories.

"It was always so exciting responding to a scene because I knew my hero was going to be standing right there to back me," said Worley. "No matter what I done, he's backing me and it's hard."

All the organizers of the benefit wanted to do was give back to the Chief.

An account for Brumlow's family is still active through the Tennessee Valley Credit Union. If you would like to donate, you can access that account here.

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