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Voters speculate Sen. Bob Corker will run for president in 2020

Sen. Bob Corker, (R) Tennessee, speaks with media. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Senator Bob Corker is not running for re-election to the U.S. Senate.

Now, there's speculation he might be looking for another job: President of the United States.

We reached out to Senator Corker's office Thursday and asked about his political future.

"He is focused on the next 15 months and ending his time in the Senate strong," said Todd Womack, Senator Corker's Chief of Staff.

However, some voters think since Corker didn't say he's retiring, that means he's looking to do something else in Washington.

"He may be the next President!" Willard Rutledge said.

Back in August, before he announced he wouldn't make another Senate run, he made strong statements about the Trump administration.

He said this about President Donald Trump:

"[He's] not been able to demonstrate the stability nor some of the competence that he needs to demonstrate in order to be successful," Corker said.

Then, last week Corker addressed leaving the Senate.

"If there's an opportunity for me to make a difference in some other way I'm sure that I would look at it," he said.

We recently asked former White House Communications Director Tom Griscom what he makes of the announcement.

"There's nothing that says 'I'm not finished with that chapter of my life'," Griscom said.

We asked voters what they think of the idea.

"If he decides to run then that'd be great," Stephen McDonald said.

"We would really greatly love for him to run for President," Jenna Pope said.

Chattanooga Tea Party leader Mark West says he wouldn't be surprised if Corker runs but hopes he doesn't.

"I was pleased to hear that he's retiring with the hopes we can replace Senator Corker with a much more conservative individual who will honor the constitution," West said.

Senator Corker will remain chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee until his term ends next year.

The last time someone opposed a sitting president in the same party was in 1992.

Conservative Commentator Pat Buchanan challenged George H.W. Bush.

Bush went on to win the primary, but then lost the election to Bill Clinton.

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