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Ooltewah High releases owls in school wildlife sanctuary

Image via Cade Shortt.

UPDATE:

The last week of school, brought two new additions to the owl family for the Ooltewah High School Owls with the release of two Eastern Screech-Owls into the school’s outdoor sanctuary developed by the students and staff. The release of the owls coordinated with Happinest Wildlife Rehabilitation and Rescue reintroduced Nissan and Mandy; two rehabilitated, adult owls, back into the wild. Happinest is a small group of licensed volunteers dedicated to the rehabilitation of Tennessee’s sick, injured or orphaned wildlife. Alix Parks of Happinest assisted with the release at the school.

Over the last couple of years, Ooltewah High developed the owl sanctuary and outdoor classroom on the school grounds to provide a home for their school’s mascot namesake. An overgrown and neglected wooded area that had served as a dumping ground for years was reclaimed for the sanctuary location and will be home to rehabilitated rescue owls.

“We used grant money for our materials, and students are putting up educational signs around the area, and planning activities and research for class use,” said Bill Fischer, International Baccalaureate instructor and H.O.O. Club advisor at Ooltewah High School. “We also have a couple of cameras in place to hopefully capture activity at the nesting boxes.”

The school began an environmental club with one of the main goals of developing the sanctuary. The club is known as the H.O.O. Club (Housing Ooltewah Owls) and advisory. The students built and installed nesting boxes for the Eastern Screech-owl in the area.

The H.O.O Club and Happinest will release two more owls into the sanctuary in June or July.

PREVIOUSLY:

Over the last couple of years, Ooltewah High has developed an owl sanctuary and outdoor classroom on the school grounds. The school began an environmental club with one of the main goals in the development of the sanctuary. The club is known as the H.O.O. Club (Housing Ooltewah Owls) and advisory. The students built and installed nest boxes for the Eastern Screech-owl in the area.

The overgrown and neglected wooded area which served as a dumping ground for years has now been reclaimed and will be home to rehabilitated resue owls. The club used grant money for materials, and students are now working on putting up some educational signs around the area, and planning activities/research for class use. There are also a couple of cameras in place to capture activity at the nesting boxes.

Alix Parks, of Happinest Wildlife Rehabilitation & Rescue, will release a couple of rehabilitated owls into the HOO Club’s environmental sanctuary at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 23.

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